Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier 66 years ago

MINNEAPOLIS -- The Twins celebrated the 66th anniversary of Jackie Robinson breaking Major League Baseball's color barrier with a ceremony before Monday's game against the Angels.

All players from the Twins and Angels, as well as on-field personnel, wore Robinson's No. 42 during the game. In 1997, under the direction of Commissioner Bud Selig, Robinson's No. 42 was retired across all of Major League Baseball in an unprecedented tribute.

Twins first baseman Justin Morneau said he felt honored to wear No. 42 again, especially after watching the film, "42," in a special screening in Fort Myers, Fla., last month. Morneau was surprised to see himself in the movie, as he's featured near the end in a scene that shows big leaguers running onto the field wearing No. 42 on Jackie Robinson Day.

"He might be the most important player who has ever put on a uniform," Morneau said. "So it's good that his story is being told again and that on April 15 every year we get to celebrate what he meant to this country."

Twins manager Ron Gardenhire also saw the movie on Sunday night and came away impressed with the film and what Robinson stands for.

"It was a really neat movie," Gardenhire said. "It was emotional for me seeing all the history of Jackie and what he went through. It's just an emotional movie. The baseball parts were OK, but the movie itself and everything about it was really cool."

Arcia sent back to Triple-A after Major League debut

LAA@MIN: Arcia picks up his first big league hit

MINNEAPOLIS -- Oswaldo Arcia's first trip to the Major Leagues was a brief one.

Arcia, ranked as the No. 93 overall prospect and as the Twins' No. 5 prospect, was recalled from Triple-A Rochester before Monday's game against the Angels but was optioned immediately after the game. Arcia took the place of Wilkin Ramirez, who was placed on the paternity list on Sunday, but will rejoin the Twins on Tuesday.

"It was fun to watch him walk to the plate, but he'll get plenty of opportunities if he continues doing what he was doing in the Minor Leagues," Twins manager Ron Gardenhire said. "It's just one of those things where we brought him up here for a reason to get an at-bat and help us for a game or two."

Arcia, who started in left field and batted seventh, wasted no time getting his first big league hit, as he singled against Angels right-hander Joe Blanton in his first at-bat and reached second on an error by right fielder Josh Hamilton.

"I was very content," Arcia said through translator and Twins bullpen coach Bobby Cuellar. "I was looking for a good pitch to hit, and I hit it."

Arcia ended up going 1-for-3 in his debut but dropped a fly ball in the seventh for an error and was replaced by Aaron Hicks in the top of the eighth inning.

Arcia, 21, said he was notified of the decision that he would be called up to the Twins by Rochester manager Gene Glynn on Saturday after the Red Wings played in a doubleheader. He added that he told Gardenhire he was willing to play wherever they put him, even though he's mostly been used in right field throughout his Minor League career.

"I told him I was ready to play wherever," Arcia said before the game. "Left field, center, right -- I played all of these all the time in Venezuela."

Gardenhire added that Arcia was originally slated to start at designated hitter, but Josh Willingham came in feeling sick, so Willingham was out of the lineup with Arcia getting the start in left. Ryan Doumit started at DH.

Arcia, who was the organization's Minor League Player of the Year last season, was off to a hot start at Triple-A, hitting .414 with three homers, two doubles and eight RBIs in nine games.

Mired in slow start, Hicks gets break from lineup

MIN@BAL: Hicks's RBI single puts the Twins up late

MINNEAPOLIS -- Twins center fielder Aaron Hicks was held out of the starting lineup for second time this season on Monday against the Angels to get a chance to regroup for a couple of days, as Sunday's game was postponed due to weather.

Hicks, though, came into the game as a defensive replacement for Oswaldo Arcia in the eighth inning. He drew a walk in the bottom of the eighth and picked up his first career stolen base before scoring on a double from Pedro Florimon.

But Hicks is still off to a slow start this season, hitting just .047 (2-for-43) with four walks and a Major League-high 20 strikeouts. Darin Mastroianni made just his second start of the year in center field in Hicks' absence and went 1-for-5 with a stolen base and a run.

"I wanted to play Mastroianni," Twins manager Ron Gardenhire said before the game. "He's been sitting for a while. He last played in Kansas City, but we had a day off and yesterday off."

Gardenhire said the Twins will continue to be patient with Hicks, who spent time before the game working with hitting coach Tom Brunansky.

"I just want him to be able breathe a little bit and get back to his routine with Bruno," Gardenhire said. "So we'll go from there."