SAN DIEGO -- The findings of former Sen. George Mitchell's report Thursday concerning the use of performance-enhancing drugs in baseball included the names of several players with ties to the San Diego Padres, but no current players.

The list of players in Mitchell's 311-page report included former Padre Ken Caminiti, the MVP of the National League in 1996, and current hitting coach Wally Joyner, who played from 1996-99 with San Diego.

Other players with ties to the Padres who were mentioned in the Mitchell Report include pitcher Ron Villone (who played parts of 1995-96 with the Padres), outfielder Rondell White (1993), pitcher Kevin Brown (1998), pitcher Matt Herges (2003), catcher Gary Bennett Jr. (2003), outfielder Jack Cust (2006) and infielder Adam Riggs (2001).

Outfielder Gary Matthews Jr. (1999) and pitcher Ismael Valdez (2004) had previously been named as part of an investigation by the Albany, N.Y., district attorney.

Outfielder Gary Sheffield (1992-93) and catcher Benito Sanitago (1986-92) were previously named by FBI investigators as alleged to have received anabolic steroids from BALCO.

"We are pleased that Senator Mitchell's investigation into the use of performance-enhancing substances in Major League Baseball is now complete and his report has been issued," Padres CEO Sandy Alderson said in a statement.

"We appreciate and have always supported the Senator's thorough review of this illegal usage in baseball. We also embrace his recommendations to improve an already strong MLB and Players Association Joint Drug Prevention and Treatment Program. Going forward, we will continue to cooperate with the Office of the Commissioner to help ensure against the recurrence of any similar threat to the integrity of baseball in the future."

The findings of Mitchell's report concerning use of performance-enhancing drugs in Major League Baseball were released at 11 a.m. PT on Thursday.

Several high-profile, superstar-caliber players were among those named in the Mitchell Report, the product of a 21-month, multimillion dollar investigation that could shape decisions, prompt punitive actions against active players, and usher in the next era of the sport.

Free agent Roger Clemens, Andy Pettitte of the New York Yankees, Miguel Tejada of the Houston Astros, Eric Gagne of the Milwaukee Brewers and Paul Lo Duca of the Washington Nationals were among the most prominent former and current All-Stars to be mentioned in the lengthy report, which spans 311 pages, plus multiple exhibits, including evidence of signed checks, handwritten notes and shipping receipts.

The entire report is available for viewing here at MLB.com in PDF format. It will be presented in a searchable, clickable version as soon as the 311 pages of content can be converted appropriately.

While the report detailed drug use in baseball by naming those accused, the report also contained 19 separate recommendations for the sport to move forward from this point, proceeding after a culture of steroids and performance-enhancement substances grew exponentially in the late 1990s.

Mitchell's report named both Major League Baseball and the MLB Players Association in assigning blame, charging leadership -- from the Commissioner to club owners and general general managers -- for allowing the issue to proliferate.

"We also hope that Senator Mitchell's report provides an opportunity for all who love baseball to refocus their attention, with the greatest confidence possible, to the game on the field," Alderson said.